Marine Arts and Artifacts Specialists
Home
Contact Us
(949) 642-7945 
MARITIME PAINTINGSMARINE THEMED PAINTINGSSHIP MODELSSAILOR ARTSARTIFACTSINSTRUMENTSBOOKS & EPHEMERA
  advanced :: search >
show all  Page:    1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  next

 

 
 
 

Elisha Taylor Baker
American (1827-1890)

Ferry Arriving, Castle Clinton in New York Harbor

Full write up to come

Admin Details
view details
 

 

 
 
 

Elisha Taylor Baker
American (1827-1890)

Ferry Departing Castle Clinton, New York Harbor

Full write up to follow

Admin Details
view details
 

 

 
 
 

Thomas Buttersworth
English (1768-1837)

The British Victory of Trafalgar Against the French and Spanish
A Pair of Exceptional Miniatures

The Battle of Trafalgar, fought October 5, 1805, is perhaps the best known naval battle of all time. As a result of the victory, Britain held an almost unchallenged domination of the seas for a decade, and most of the next century. Artist Thomas Buttersworth served faithfully in the British Navy, and early in his new career painted spectacular scenes of naval battles, none more famous. This superb pair of miniatures is a prime example.

Off Cadiz, the British Royal Navy Fleet led by Admiral Viscount Lord Nelson and Vice Admiral Collingwood at last sighted the combined French and Spanish Fleets of Admiral Villeneuve, Admiral d’Avila, and Admiral Cisternes, and sought to deny Napoleon’s naval empire. In dramatic action, a First Rate British Warship drives between two of the largest opponents, cannons firing broadsides. It is believed to be Collingwood’s Flagship ROYAL SOVEREIGN, heavily damaging and eventually capturing the Spanish Flagship SANTA ANA. Two more captured Spanish Ships are in the second work, the British Union Jack on the flag hoist over the red-and-gold ensigns. Thirty-two British ships fought 23 French and 15 Spanish warships at Trafalgar, and while the British lost 1,587 fighting men, the French and Spanish losses are estimated closer to 16,000.

As a result of his deep involvement in this combat, Nelson is both commemorated and mourned. Although victorious over the combined French and Spanish fleets, the brilliant and innovative tactician was mortally wounded during the battle, victim of a French sharpshooter. His loss was noted and felt throughout the British Empire. This expertly detailed small pair of paintings by Buttersworth successfully renders this important landmark battle closing Napoleon’s ambition to attack Britain.

Admin Details
view details
 

 

 
 
 

Julian O. Davidson
American (1853-1894)

USS Constitution in Action Against HMS Guerriere

A naval battle scene from the War of 1812, this work by Julian O. Davidson captures a dramatic turning point for the American Navy, the first significant defeat of a British Sailing Warship by a Naval Frigate. No less a vessel than U.S.S. CONSTITUTION is firing a broadside on approach at the distressed H.M.S. GUERRIERE, after her mizzen mast has toppled, limiting her maneuvering for position. The scene glows with action and the harsh reality of nautical combat.

Breaking the British dominance of naval warfare, the ship commanded by Captain Isaac Hull, met H.M.S. GUERRIERE under the command of Captain James Dacres on August 17, 1812 after the British officer issued a direct challenge. Dacres was so confident that he promised his crew 4 months pay for a 15-minute victory, but things didn’t go as he planned. Approximately 45 minutes of sailing for dominant positioning with some long-range volleys, and the ships closed to rake each other with cannon broadsides. While the British mizzen mast was splintered, some shots actually bounced off the sides of the American oak ship, birthing her now famous ‘Old Ironsides’ nickname.

This captured moment, of CONSTITUTION coming around with another broadside is the decisive moment of battle, her guns barraging the British who try to respond. On the next approach, GUERRIERE was surrendered. Davidson does a proper homage to the victory and devastation, with cannons flaring and the red glow reflecting in the smoke, men high in the rigging and low in the sea. The artistic effort by Davidson invokes the tragic wonder and awe that a marine artist seeks from his audience, even with the outcome apparent.

Admin Details
view details
 

 

 
 
 

Montague Dawson
British (1895-1973)

Nearing Home, The HELICON

Bright and magnificent, the Ship HELICON slices on a quick reach in this maritime merchant ship portrait with its remarkable realism in his signature loose stroke. The sailing ship carries a proper spread of canvas for the existing wind, and Montague Dawson portrays numerous sailors active on her deck and in the rigging. Her white hull glistens, and shows some of the inevitable rust of a hard-working steel-and-iron hull ship. The ocean is alive with movement beneath the ship.

HELICON was built by Charles Connell & Co. of Glasgow to order for German owners Bernard Wencke & Son in 1887. She measured 230'6" Length with a 38'4" Beam, and weighed in at 1613 net tons. Connell & Co. had launched a near-identical sister ship to HELICON the year prior, the historic vessel BALCLUTHA, which is now a famous museum ship based in San Francisco.

After Wencke purchased the British STAR OF THE SEA in 1884, they renamed that ship HELICON. Loaded with 2000 tons of railroad tracks, the ship departed Hull on Feb. 2, 1886, bound for Sydney. She was never seen again. In memory, the Wencke firm named their newest ship HELICON, and it served the company on voyages to Australia, Chile and Africa for years, selling to Spanish interests in 1920. The ship served nine more years as VIUDA LLUSA, until broken up in 1929. Dawson may have known this ship early as an artist, and revisited the subject later in his career to produce this painting.

Admin Details
view details
 

 

 
 
 

William John Huggins
British (1781-1845)

The Northern Whale Fishery

The Ship Harmony of Hull and Other Ice-Bound Whalers on the Davis Straits between Baffin Bay, Canada and Greenland.

Huggins, a one time a sailor with the East India Company and firsthand witness to the scene depicted, first painted this well-known image in 1828. Entitled Northern Whale Fishery, the image was engraved by Edward Duncan in 1829 (Huggins son-in-law) and brought greater fame to both men for illuminating the rewards and perils of whaling in the icy waters on the Davis Strait whaling ground between southeast Baffin Bay, Canada and Greenland. The original 1828 work now hangs in the renowned New Bedford Whaling Museum, New Bedford, Massachusetts.

This second, larger and more proficient interpretation of the scene was most likely commissioned by Robert Bell in 1835 (son to Thomas Bell, owner of the HARMONY). The American built bark HARMONY of 292 tons sits at the center of the painting with the MARGARET of London to the left and the ELIZA SWAN of Montrose to the right. Filled with incredible detail throughout, nearly every aspect of whaling is depicted- from the chase and capture, to processing the catch alongside, to “trying out” or boiling down the blubber on HARMONY’s bow.

Two other masted ships are shown, including one foundering as the ice closes in on her hull, her crew surely trying to salvage what they can as they stand alongside. Penguins gather on an ice floe near one of the twelve depicted whale boats as it closes in on a catch. Birds circle all the ships, hoping for a morsel. Huggins sets the scene masterfully and the viewer can almost feel what it’s like to be there.

Authentic period paintings of the very interesting and historically significant whaling era are extremely rare. This painting not only depicts history, it is itself an important piece of history, combining fine detail, skillful brushwork and sensitive coloration in a work that any collector would cherish.

Admin Details
view details
 

Page:    1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  next
Maritime Paintings - Search Results, Marine art, Maritime art, Marine Arts AND Artifacts, Maritime paintings, Marine paintings, Maritime gallery.

Director's Statement About Us Essays & Articles Gallery Archives Artist Listing
    
website stats
   
Related Links Site Map Contact Us
back to top
Click here to scroll down
scroll down